9 Things To Do When You are Moving To Another Country

It opens your mind and test your limits and your boundaries…

Moving to another country… Have you ever though about the endless possibilities that the globe offers you? Living overseas is something I always envisioned. When you’re thinking about your future, how you should live, your passion should always comes first. Easy to say, but hard to do? No matter the reasons, I do believe everything is possible.

Living overseas is the most rewarding thing you could ever do – it opens your mind to a foreign culture, foreign people and foreign language, and test your limits and your boundaries.

Living overseas is surely a life experience and traveling by yourself is something we should try, just because it’s important to be temporarily alone and capable of doing so. When the concept of moving to Tel-Aviv came up, I was surely ecstatic, excited, and most of it all unprepared. It’s almost the time to leave, and I’ve compiled my most precious tips about this soon to be most exciting experience. Read on to found out about the 9 things to do when you are moving to another country – and I hope you’re on the same state of mind as I am: we all should relocate for at least 6 months – one year.

1. Get some experience

Wherever you might relocate yourself and your backpack (if only it was enough…), you need to be prepared to every eventuality that could come along. So before searching for anything else, one of the most important thing is to solve this issue: if you’re not lucky enough to relocate with a job, you need to be aware of your situation and find one. How to do it? Motivation and perseverance are keys. Shape your resume to its last version, send it to anyone that might be willing to help you and do whatever it takes to extend the length of your resume. If you’re taking the route of the university, it’s not the same scheme, but if you’re relocating for the love of if, you need to find a job, because girl gotta eat, shop and drink coffee. I said it. I’m 24, and first time I’m relocating somewhere, I tried to manage it to the best, and extending the length of my resume and constant research was definitely a good point. Job hunting sucks, but all matters are the skills you will acquire and their values to your potential employer.

2. Save money

The resolution to relocate somewhere else is the first step. As I said, there are mandatory things to do such as the visa (keep scrolling), but most important regards the money. Relocating is not a light decision and you want to save as much as money as you can.

You will need to pay your rent, and getting clothes and just be able to have a social life has a cost, and if you’re not able to depend only on those old saving, keep in mind that depending on the country, life could be easily – if not always – more expensive that your homie lifestyle. Just post point those shopping splurges. You will be more grateful to yourself for all of those endless efforts.

While you’re searching for a job, setting a new life is expensive, and you need the extra cash to survive. And to get your coffee every morning.

3. Do the research

If you’re not decided on the country, some research need to be done. Be prepared for everything – local costumes, different language, transportation and the local food. Mostly, keep in mind that you have to be excited about it.

4. Choose the country

The world is your oyster, so why not choose any country? When the concept of moving presents itself, I had several options – I was hesitant and I’d definitely wanted to move to New York. It’s such an inspiring, powerful and incredible city, but it was my second option. I also consider the concept of moving to Australia – who wouldn’t want?- but, I have a particular interest for Tel Aviv.

One of my most precious advice would be to do a vision board.

Some things you have to keep in mind:

– Do you have knowledge of the language? If you’re an english native, things will be easy. Otherwise, start to learn the local language. I’m starting and this is so rewarding!

– What is the medical insurance regime? Do some research, and get an insurance that could cover for everything like this one.

– Does the country of your choice support your field/work/interest?

– What is the climate like? Warmer or colder? It’s important since you can’t take your whole wardrobe with you. You will need to choose.

– How long will you stay? Be assured your visa will be handed down to you for the same period. Don’t forget, it regards also your choice of wardrobe.

5. Visa

This one is pretty obvious and one of the big barrier. If you’re not picking a European country, you will need a visa. Depending on the country it might be easier or there will be obstacles. Trust me, it’s the condition to have a happy trip and you want to avoid any drama.

Research for arrangements with your country of residence – some countries have some, and some don’t. I know that France and the U.S. have a lotĀ of them. Another option is to get sponsored by your employer. So that’s tough, but it’s possible. Employers are not always in to sponsor your Visa, because it can get quite pricey but, they will if you’re an intern for example.

You also have the Tourist Visa option which is good, but you won’t be able to work until you have the right visa. I you’re an European citizen and you’re going to another European city, this won’t be necessary. The easier the better right?

6. Get it done: apply for jobs/ internship

Pretty obvious. You will need a job or if you’re a student, an internship to extend the length of your resume. You might be able to get both. Still, do the search BEFORE relocating. For most, you will need to be prepared to every possibility, and you need to nail the job interview. Be confident, you can do it!

7. Find a place to stay

Where will you stay? Which part of the country? Obviously, bigger metropolitan cities are filled with great opportunities, and it will be easier for you to find a job, and a coffee place – which is one of the most important thing on your to-do list.

8. Socialize

In this millennial area, the digital is king, and it is such an help for your research. Google my friend helped me a lot regarding socialization. Booking a ticket is not the hardest part, you need to find a group of people you can count on regarding any questions you may have. Locals are nice and helpful, but if you want to be prepared, try to know the locals and their culture before going. People are such helpful when you need to know about something in particular such as transportations, best place to get your coffee or to eat. It makes all the difference. Ask your Facebook friends, and I admit, it’s a tad awkward, but in this digital area, you’re not the only one who’s trying to make it out there!

Relocating somewhere is a challenge, but if you’re willing to do so, if you’re motivated and barriers aren’t something that afraid you, I bet you can do it. The next stage of your move regards you bagages, and keep in mind that as humans we’re adaptable. It takes energy, but I know it’s rewarding. First step of a big experience, and I’m taking it. How do you feel about relocating?

 

 

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  • Very nice post. I have been thinking of relocating to Europe (Particularly France) from the Caribbean Next yr God’s willing, and totally agree with all the points of advice you brought up.

    Enjoy Tel Aviv, and I hope you have a fabulous and Successful time..

    http://www.nothingbutvelvet.com

    • Really? That’d be awesome. France is the place I always feel at home! Good look, and I’d love to know if you’re willing to do so! Thanks Menellia! I’d share it on this space! x

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  • A Road to Travel

    We have had to encounter a lot of your 9 things just in our journey around the world. The Visas are important but the most difficult is always the language barrier. We try to go online and get the key phrases that we might use. Moving to another country to live would be such a huge undertaking and you have the basics in place. The only addition I might make is a study of the customs each country is so different.

    • I can definitely relate! When I moved the language barrier was such a pb! Even if I’m bilingual in english, it’s not the same! It’s a huge step, and I was ready to do it for a while I guess,. Yea, also this, it’s really a good point! x

  • Jennifer Morrow

    We spent 3 years dreaming about our big move, and really made it all happen in less than 1 year. It takes planing, preparation, and flexibility!

    • Yes to all 3! You’re damn right!

  • Rashmi & Chalukya

    We have been staying in Switzerland for last more than a year and it has been a great experience learning new culture and making new acquaintances.

    • It should have been such an experience when you’re coming from another part of the world that ain’t Europe! Everything is different, and I know exactly what you mean! I have been learning a new language, and it’s damn rewardfull! x

  • Tina

    I planed just to travel around Australia but I met my partner here and stayed. It was like an not expected move to another country. We had a lot of up and downs but it is so worth it if you found the right person to spend your life with. Great blog post!

    • Moving to another country is so harsh, but for me, and I guess you make it sounds, it’s worthy. I took some decisions according to my stay there, and I think I made the right ones! And yes it’s damn true. As long as you find your happy place, it doesn’t matter where you are! x